Leeds Met Repository Open Search

If you would like to include your research outputs or Open Educational Resources in the repository please email repository@leedsmet.ac.uk; you will receive a reply in two working days.

Frequently Asked Questions

Open Access

Institutional Repositories

Copyright

An Institutional Repository for Leeds Met

Answers

Why should I put my research papers in The Repository?

  • Disseminate your work to a wider audience
  • Increase the impact of your research
  • Facilitate retrieval by Internet search engines including Google
  • Provide persistent URLs for your research papers
  • Meet funder requirements as, increasingly, funders are mandating that the research they fund is made openly available
  • Link to your publications from your own web-page or blog

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What is meant by Open Access?

Open Access(OA) means free, immediate, and unrestricted access to digital scholarly material, primarily research articles published in peer-reviewed journals.

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Where can I find out more about Open Access?

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Does my research funder support Open Access?

Several research funders - including all but one of the UK Research Councils - have made open access deposit of research outputs a condition of funding. They are adopting this proactive stance to ensure that their funded research is as widely disseminated as possible. A service summarising publisher policies - JULIET - can be found here.

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What is an Institutional Repository?

An Institutional Repository (IR) is a digital collection capturing and preserving the intellectual output of a single or multi-university community.

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How is an Institutional Repository different from an Open Access journal?

There are two discrete strands to the Open Access paradigm: The Open Access journal is a peer reviewed online journal and first cousin to the traditional subscription based scholarly journal. An Institutional Repository, however, does not publish material but simply makes material available that has already been published in a traditional peer-reviewed journal (so called post-prints) or that has been accepted for publication in a traditional peer-reviewed journal (so called pre-prints). Moreover, an Institutional Repository can contain "intellectual output" other than research; Learning Objects; "grey" literature (conference proceedings etc); students' work (phD theses/Masters' dissertations); digital images of heritage collections.

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What is meant by the term "self-archiving"?

In the context of OA the term "self-archiving" means the practice whereby an author makes a copy of their work freely available in an Open Access repository. An individual author may literally upload their work themselves or the process may be mediated (by the library for example).

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Will the article in the repository be identical to the final version printed by the publisher?

Not necessarily. In fact the majority of publishers will not allow the final published version of an article to be self-archived and the version in the repository will be an author's final draft. This may well have different pagination to the final published version.

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How do I reference articles I find in a repository, they may have different pagination for direct quotes, do we need to get the pagination from the publisher's copy?

Institutional Repositories are to facilitate access only; the established academic practice is to ensure that references are to the final published copy of an article and not to a version in a repository that may well have different pagination.

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What is meant by the terms "post-print" and "pre-print"?

These are established terms in the repository community but are recognised to cause confusion elsewhere. In the context of OA "pre-print" is the version of the paper before peer review and "post-print" refers to the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

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Do I own the copyright for my published research papers?

It depends on the nature of the licence you sign with your publisher. In most cases, the default position is that the publisher will retain your copyright though sometimes have more than one type of licence; it's worth discussing your requirements if you are unhappy with the standard publishing terms and conditions.

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Why would a commercial journal publisher allow the deposit of research for which it owns the copyright in an Open Access repository?

The Open Access movement represents the academic community taking back control of their intellectual output from publishers and ever since the concept was first mooted by Stevan Harnad in 1994 there has been a growing body of advocates and lobbyists who have been successful in raising the profile of OA at national and international level. Publishers are increasingly adopting a formal position on "self-archiving" (the practice whereby an author makes an article freely available in an Open Acees repository) and the University of Nottingham SHERPA project maintains the RoMEO database which gives a summary of permissions that are normally given as part of each publisher's copyright transfer agreement.

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Which journals allow self-archiving into an Open Access repository?

The University of Nottingham SHERPA project maintains the RoMEO database which gives a summary of permissions that are normally given as part of each publisher's copyright transfer agreement. It is possible to search the database by publisher or by individual journal title. Though not comprehensive, the database currently has records for 386 publishers (30/04/08) and it is estimated that this covers between 8,000-9,000 journals; the vast majority of titles of interest to UK researchers. The database is being added to all the time.

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How can I find out if my publisher will allow me to deposit a copy of my research paper in the repository?

The SHERPA RoMEO database can be searched by publisher or by individual journal title. If you can not find your publisher or journal in the database it may be necessary to contact them directly. The repository team can help you with this.

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What will be the repository content?

The initial focus of the repository will be an Open Access research archive and as such the content will be published, peer-reviewed research output (i.e. post-prints); this will diversify to incorporate articles that have been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal but not yet published (i.e. pre-prints). In the future, it is also intended that the repository will further diversify to include Learning Objects; "grey" literature (conference proceedings etc); students' work (phD theses/Masters' dissertations); digital images of heritage collections.

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Will content be limited to published peer reviewed output?

No. Although the start-up phase of the project will focus on published peer-reviewed output (i.e. post-prints) it is anticipated that it will diversify to incorporate articles that have been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal but not yet published (i.e. pre-prints). In the future, it is also intended that the repository will further diversify to include Learning Objects; "grey" literature (conference proceedings etc); students' work (phD theses/Masters' dissertations); digital images of heritage collections.

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How can I learn more about the project or become involved?

In the first instance contact the Repository Development Officer Nick Sheppard.

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For feedback and enquiries please email repository@leedsmet.ac.uk; you will receive a reply within two working days.